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"Remember, anyone can love you when the sun is shining. In the storms is where you learn who truly cares for you."
-Anonymous

Alcohol and drugs

Addiction comes in many forms; being knowledgeable about the names, risks, and effects of addictive substances can be an excellent tool in avoiding addiction or relapse and recognizing it in others. Here Sober Nexus has provided a comprehensive summary of some of the most commonly-used substances.

  • Examples: Each individual substance can go by many names as their popularity and variations shift. These names are often slang used to disguise the identity of drugs. Some drugs that can be prescribed for medical use may also have commercial names.
  • How it’s taken: Drugs can be introduced to the body through a variety of methods, including swallowing or chewing, smoking or inhalation, snorting through the nose, intravenous injection, and absorption through the skin; many drugs can be used in more than one of these ways. Aside from the risks each drug poses on its own, some methods of delivery are more dangerous and physically harmful to the body on their own than others, and can put addicts at risk of other health problems as well. Some examples are nasal damage from snorting, or exposure to disease or infection by sharing needles.
  • Effects: Drugs contain one or more chemicals that alter the brain, influencing behavior, perception, and temperament. They can also induce physical side effects, both internal and external.
  • Health risks: Particularly with prolonged and repeated usage, drugs can put a user at risk of a wide range of lasting or even permanent physical and mental health issues.

 

  • Alchohol

    Alcohol

    The most common, legal, and socially acceptable item on this list, alcohol is nevertheless a drug. Many people can drink alcohol without excess or abuse, but it still carries a high risk for addiction, abetted by its ease of acquisition.

    Examples: Found in liquor, beer, and wine

    How it's taken: Swallowed

    Effects: In low doses, euphoria, mild stimulation, relaxation, lowered inhibitions; in higher doses, drowsiness, slurred speech, nausea, emotional volatility, loss of coordination, visual distortions, impaired memory, sexual dysfunction, loss of consciousness

    Health risks: Increased risk of injuries, violence, fetal damage (in pregnant women); depression; neurologic deficits; hypertension; liver and heart disease; addiction; fatal overdose

  • Cannabis

    Cannabis

    A class of chemicals that repress neurotransmitter release in the brain, found in cannabis and some other plants. They can also be synthesized. One of the nation’s most controversial and popular recreational drugs, marijuana is legal in some states for medical use. Despite its widespread popularity, it can be just as dangerous and addictive as other substances when abused.

    Marijuana | Examples: Blunt, dope, ganja, grass, herb, joint, bud, Mary Jane, pot, reefer, green, trees, smoke, sinsemilla, skunk, weed

    Hashish | Examples: Boom, gangster, hash, hash oil, hemp

     

    How it’s taken: Smoked, swallowed

    Effects: Euphoria; relaxation; slowed reaction time; distorted sensory perception; impaired balance and coordination; increased heart rate and appetite; impaired learning or memory; anxiety; panic attacks; psychosis

    Health risks: Cough, frequent respiratory infections; possible mental health decline; addiction

  • Opioids

    Opioids

    Several psychoactive chemicals that resemble morphine in their effects. They are among the world’s oldest known drugs, and are sometimes used to treat severe and/or chronic pain, particularly in terminal conditions such as cancer.

    ---Heroin | Examples: Diacetylmorphine; smack, horse, brown sugar, dope, H, junk, skag, skunk, white horse, China white, cheese

    How it’s taken: Injected, smoked, snorted

     

    ---Opium | Examples: Laudanum, paregoric; big O, black stuff, block, gum, hop

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, smoked

     

    Effects: Euphoria; drowsiness; impaired coordination; dizziness; confusion; nausea; sedation; feeling of heaviness in the body; slowed or arrested breathing

    Health risks:Constipation; endocarditis; hepatitis; HIV; addiction; fatal overdose

  • Stimulants

    Stimulants

    Psychoactive drugs that can induce temporary improvements in mental or physical function, including heightened awareness, wakefulness, and reactions. Many are used as prescription medications for weight loss or treatment of lethargy, depression, and attentional disorders such as ADHD.

    ---Cocaine | Examples: Cocaine hydrochloride; blow, bump, C, candy, Charlie, coke, crack, flake, rock, snow, toot

    How it’s taken: Snorted, smoked, injected

     

    ---Amphetamine | Examples: Biphetamine, Dexedrine; bennies, black beauties, crosses, hearts, LA turnaround, speed, truck drivers, uppers

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, snorted, smoked, injected

     

    ---Methamphetamine | Examples: Desoxyn; meth, ice, crank, chalk, crystal, fire, glass, go fast, speed

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, snorted, smoked, injected

     

    Effects: Increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, metabolism; feelings of exhilaration; increased energy, mental alertness; tremors; reduced appetite; irritability; anxiety; panic; paranoia; violent behavior; psychosis

    Health risks:Weight loss, insomnia; cardiac or cardiovascular complications; stroke; seizures; addiction; methamphetamine – severe dental problems

  • Club Drugs

    Club drugs

    Also called rave drugs; a range of “designer drugs,” manufactured chemical substances that are popular at dance clubs and parties and used at such events for their stimulating or psychotropic properties, to “enhance the experience.”

    ---Bath Salts | Examples: Purple Wave, Zoom, Vanilla Sky, Cloud Nine, many others; masquerade as household products such as bath salts, fertilizer, or insect repellant with brand names, in order to evade laws that prohibit the sale and manufacture of drugs and pass under the nose of law enforcement.

    How it’s taken: Injected, smoked, snorted, swallowed

    Effects: Chest pain; high blood pressure; cravings; headaches; hallucinations; nausea; dilated pupils; rapid heartbeat; muscle spasms; panic attacks; agitation, paranoia, aggression

    Health risks: Suicidal thoughts; heart attack; liver or kidney failure; dehydration; breakdown of muscle tissue

     

    ---Flunitrazepam | Examples: Rohypnol; forget-me pill, Mexican Valium, R2, roach, Roche, roofies, roofinol, rope, rophies

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, snorted

    Effects: Mild hallucinogenic effects; increased tactile sensitivity; empathic feelings; lowered inhibition; anxiety; chills; sweating; teeth clenching; muscle cramping; sedation; muscle relaxation; confusion; memory loss; dizziness; impaired coordination

    Health risks: Sleep disturbances; depression; impaired memory; hyperthermia; addiction; Note: Associated with sexual assaults

     

    ---MDMA | Examples: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine; Ecstasy, Adam, clarity, Eve, lover's speed, peace, uppers

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, snorted, injected

    Effects: Mild hallucinogenic effects; increased tactile sensitivity; empathic feelings; lowered inhibition; anxiety; chills; sweating; teeth clenching; muscle cramping

    Health risks:Sleep disturbances; depression; impaired memory; hyperthermia; addiction

     

    ---GHB | Examples: Gamma-hydroxybutyrate; G, Georgia home boy, grievous bodily harm, liquid ecstasy, soap, scoop, goop, liquid X

    How it’s taken: Swallowed

    Effects: Mild hallucinogenic effects; increased tactile sensitivity; empathic feelings; lowered inhibition; anxiety; chills; sweating; teeth clenching; muscle cramping; drowsiness; nausea; headache; disorientation; loss of coordination; memory loss

    Health risks: Sleep disturbances; depression; impaired memory; hyperthermia; addiction; unconsciousness; seizures; coma; Note: Associated with sexual assaults

  • Hallucinogens

    Hallucinogens

    Psychedelic or deliriant agents that cause subjective changes in thought, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Their effects are often compared to trances, dreams, or insanity.

    ---LSD | Examples: Lysergic acid diethylamide; acid, blotter, cubes, microdot yellow sunshine, blue heaven

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, absorbed through mouth tissues/skin

    Effects:  Altered states of perception and feeling; hallucinations; nausea; increased body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure; loss of appetite; sweating; sleeplessness; numbness, dizziness, weakness, tremors; impulsive behavior; rapid shifts in emotion

     

    ---Mescaline | Examples: Buttons, cactus, mesc, peyote

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, smoked

    Effects: Altered states of perception and feeling; hallucinations; nausea; increased body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure; loss of appetite; sweating; sleeplessness; numbness, dizziness, weakness, tremors; impulsive behavior; rapid shifts in emotion

     

    ---Psilocybin | Examples: Magic mushrooms, purple passion, shrooms, little smoke

    How it’s taken: Swallowed

    Effects: Altered states of perception and feeling; hallucinations; nausea; nervousness; paranoia; panic

     

    Health risks:Flashbacks, Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder

  • Dissociatives

    Dissociatives

    A category of hallucinogens that distort perceptions and produce feelings of detachment from the environment and from the self.

    ---Ketamine | Examples: Ketalar SV; cat Valium, K, Special K, vitamin K

    How it’s taken: Injected, snorted, smoked

    Effects: Feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function; analgesia; impaired memory; delirium; respiratory depression and arrest; death

     

    ---PCP | Examples: Phencyclidine; angel dust, boat, hog, love boat, peace pill

    How it’s taken: Swallowed, smoked, injected

    Effects: Feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function; analgesia; psychosis; aggression; violence; slurred speech; loss of coordination; hallucinations

     

    ---Salvia Divinorum | Examples: Salvia, Shepherdess's Herb, Maria Pastora, magic mint, Sally-D

    How it’s taken: Chewed, swallowed, smoked

    Effects: Feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function

     

    ---DXM | Examples:  Dextromethorphan, found in some cough and cold medications; Robotripping, Robo, Triple C

    How it’s taken: Swallowed

    Effects: Feelings of being separate from one’s body and environment; impaired motor function; euphoria; slurred speech; confusion; dizziness; distorted visual perceptions

    Health risks: Anxiety; tremors; numbness; memory loss; nausea

  • Other Compounds

    Anabolic steroids

    ---Anabolic Steroids have an effect similar to testosterone on the body, and can be used in medicine to stimulate bone growth and appetite, induce male puberty, and treat cancer and AIDS. The use of steroids as performance enhancers has been banned in most sports and athletic events due to the health risks and unfair advantage granted. Examples: Anadrol, Oxandrin, Durabolin, Depo-Testosterone, Equipoise; roids, juice, gym candy, pumpers

    How it’s taken: Injected, swallowed, absorbed through skin

    Effects: No intoxication effects

    Health risks: Hypertension; blood clotting and cholesterol changes; liver cysts; hostility and aggression; acne; in adolescents—premature stoppage of growth; in males—prostate cancer, reduced sperm production, shrunken testicles, breast enlargement; in females—menstrual irregularities, development of beard and other masculine characteristics

      Inhalants

    ---Inhalants can be any of a number of gasses, or chemical substances that emit gasses; the use of inhalants as a recreational drug is referred to as “huffing.” While there are some inhalant drugs intended for medical purposes, such as anesthesia used by doctors and dentists, many inhalants used for recreational purposes come from common household products. The “high” achieved from most inhalants is caused by oxygen deprivation, but users expose themselves to many harmful or toxic substances in the process, unrelated to the effects they seek to induce. Examples: Solvents (paint thinners, gasoline, glues); gases (butane, propane, aerosol propellants, nitrous oxide); nitrites (isoamyl, isobutyl, cyclohexyl); laughing gas, poppers, snappers, whippets

    How it’s taken: Inhaled through nose or mouth

    Effects: Stimulation; loss of inhibition; headache; nausea or vomiting; slurred speech; loss of motor coordination; wheezing

    Health risks: Cramps; muscle weakness; depression; memory impairment; damage to cardiovascular and nervous systems; unconsciousness; sudden death

Do you need assistance finding help for an addiction? Call us today at (888) 70-NEXUS or chat with us now.

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